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Juneteenth day celebration in Texas, June 19, 1900. Photo courtesy of Austin History Center, Austin Public Library, Wikimedia Commons.

Photo courtesy of Austin History Center, Austin Public Library, Wikimedia Commons

A vintage photo captures a Juneteenth day celebration in Texas, June 19, 1900.

The Emancipation Proclamation was read from the front balcony of Ashton Villa in Galveston, Texas, on June 19, 1865, and is commemorated as Juneteenth.  Photo courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

The Emancipation Proclamation was read from the front balcony of Ashton Villa in Galveston, Texas, on June 19, 1865, and is commemorated as Juneteenth.

Juneteenth celebrations at Goodsell United Methodist Church in Lanett, Alabama. Photo courtesy of Goodsell United Methodist Church.

Photo courtesy of Goodsell United Methodist Church

A photo collage shows Juneteenth celebrations at Goodsell United Methodist Church in Lanett, Alabama.

Korean drummers celebrate Juneteenth at Goodsell UMC in Lanett, Alabama, highlighting the multiethnic focus of the community event. Photo courtesy of Goodsell United Methodist Church.

Photo courtesy of Goodsell United Methodist Church

Korean drummers celebrate Juneteenth at Goodsell UMC in Lanett, Alabama, highlighting the multiethnic focus of the community event.

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United Methodists celebrate freedom on Juneteenth

By Laura Buchanan

On June 19, 1865, federal troops under the command of Union Major General Gordon Granger arrived in Galveston, Texas with a very important message: “all slaves are free.” 1

It was not until two and a half years after the Emancipation Proclamation went into effect in 1863 that the estimated quarter of million slaves in Texas received word that they were free and entitled to payment for their labor. This memorable day in history is celebrated as African American Freedom Day, or Juneteenth.

Now more than 150 years later, Juneteenth is commemorated across the country with parades, festivals, family activities, and worship services, reminding all of us that freedom was long sought and should not be taken for granted.

“Juneteenth is celebrated in a grand and glorious way, it marked a change that had to happen: slaves freed from bondage. Black Texans had a chance to chart their own course and their own futures,” said Arlene Youngblood, member of Wesley United Methodist Church in Austin, Texas. Youngblood participates in as many celebrations and activities as she can during the month of June, noting that slaves who migrated after receiving freedom started many of the events that are held across the nation.

Edna Reeves, member of Warren United Methodist Church in Dallas, Texas, recalls attending Juneteenth festivities as a child. In the early 1950s, her father’s workplace would close in observation of the holiday and sponsor a day of celebration at a local park. Juneteenth has special meaning for her family: her great-great-grandfather was freed in Texas. “He was 15 years old when freedom came,” she said.

United Methodist churches across the country hold a variety of Juneteenth events and worship services.

Goodsell United Methodist Church in Lanett, Alabama, collaborates with various civic organizations and churches to plan the city’s Juneteenth celebration, which welcomes approximately 10,000 attendees. The festivities are highly anticipated in the community and are supported by a wide variety of sponsors and vendors. Several events are held in Alabama and Georgia, but the main celebration festival is held on the church grounds.

The church sees the festival as an opportunity for community outreach and unification, hosting participants from all backgrounds. “Our theme [during Juneteenth] is not just about celebrating, we educate people about why we celebrate…we hold a family-friendly, ecumenical, and multi-cultural event,” said the Rev. Dr. Randy Kelley, Pastor of Goodsell United Methodist Church.

“Juneteenth is a sacred celebration culturally and religiously. It is the same as Passover for the Jewish people,” continued Dr. Kelley. He also leads an Emancipation Proclamation worship service, focusing on the efforts that were taken to ensure freedom for slaves while also speaking to God’s faithfulness during the struggles that African Americans have faced – both in the past and today.

“We look at the past to leap forward,” he said. He also reminds that John Wesley was an ardent abolitionist, leading many slaves to follow Methodist tradition. Goodsell United Methodist Church was founded in 1866 by freed slaves who “hit the ground running. They were interested in God and education…a way to spiritual and social uplifting,” said Dr. Kelley.

“[Juneteenth] has developed a sense of unity, pride, and community among African Americans,” said Cliff Dobbins, a member of McMillan United Methodist Church in Ft. Worth, Texas. Dobbins took his children, and now takes his grandchildren, to Ft. Worth’s festivities to teach them about the holiday’s history. “It’s a time to celebrate the day our ancestors were completely released and freed from slavery.”

A variety of worship resources are available to bring Juneteenth celebrations into your congregation.

1 Discipleship Ministries of The United Methodist Church, Juneteenth Resources

*This article was originally published on June 18, 2015 in recognition of the 150th anniversary of Juneteenth.

Laura Buchanan is a PR Specialist for United Methodist Communications. She may be reached at lbuchanan@umcom.org or 615-742-5413.