Skip Navigation
The Rev. David Valera gives the sermon during morning worship at the United Methodist Communications Game Changers Summit in Nashville, Tenn. Photo by Mike DuBose, UMNS.

Photo by Mike DuBose, UMNS

The Rev. David Valera gives the sermon during morning worship at the United Methodist Communications Game Changers Summit in Nashville, Tennessee.

Firdaus Kharas addresses the United Methodist Communications Game Changers Summit in Nashville, Tenn. Photo by Mike DuBose, UMNS.

Photo by Mike DuBose, UMNS

Firdaus Kharas addresses the United Methodist Communications Game Changers Summit in Nashville, Tennessee.

Firdaus Kharas watches the premier screening of his new animation,

Photo by Mike DuBose, UMNS

Firdaus Kharas watches the premier screening of his new animation, "In Praise of Prevention," during the United Methodist Communications Game Changers Summit in Nashville, Tennessee.

The Rev. David Valera and April Grace Mercado attend a session of the 2015 Game Changers Summit. Photo by Kathleen Barry, United Methodist Communications.

Photo by Kathleen Barry, United Methodist Communications

The Rev. David Valera and April Grace Mercado attend a session of the 2015 Game Changers Summit.

Previous Next

Conference attendees encouraged to ‘change the world’

By Joey Butler
Sept. 21, 2015 ǀ NASHVILLE, Tenn. (UMNS)

“I see in you the faith you can change the world, the hope you bring to those who have no hope and the love for what you do. It’s not the bottom line that matters; it’s about how we change the world.”

That's what the Rev. David Valera, executive director of Connectional Ministries of the Pacific Northwest Conference, told those attending the final day of the 2015 Game Changers Summit.

The summit, hosted by United Methodist Communications, featured innovators who are international leaders in the use of technology and communications for the social good.

Photos and covereage

Read more about the 2015 Game Changers Summit.

See photos from the event on our Flickr feed.

After two days of panels and workshops by leaders in the information and communications technology for development (ICT4D) field, Valera brought home how United Methodists could embrace such innovation to live out their calling to care for those in need.

“John Wesley created a movement, a disruptive innovation that reached out to those at the bottom,” Valera said. “This is not about a plan of getting rich. The Game Changers’ plan is for giving people access, information, education, technology — for ways people can live with love and hope.”

Communication overcomes barriers

During the final day’s presentations, humanitarian animator Firdaus Kharas shared how communication is one of the most important ways to overcome cultural barriers.

“Modern communication can return us to the concept of one human family by breaching differences and creating knowledge about each other,” Kharas said.

Kharas said society is only beginning to understand the implications of the immediacy of modern communications. For example, if there’s an uprising or a disaster, those on the ground can take a picture on their phones, load it to the Internet and let the world know as it happens.

“We have not yet grasped all the ways we can use technology to better the human condition,” he added.

Kharas also premiered “In Praise of Prevention,” the second video Kharas has partnered with United Methodist Communications on to help educate on preventing the spread of Ebola.

In her closing benediction, the Rev. Neelley Hicks, director of ICT4D church initiatives for United Methodist Communications, told attendees, “Let us not ever weary of doing good.”

*Butler is a multimedia producer/editor for United Methodist Communications. You may contact him at (615) 742-5470 or newsdesk@umcom.org